A Maternity Nurse specialist working with newborn babies within a family environment. Although the phrase ‘nurse’ is generally used a Maternity Nurse does not have to have a nursing qualification. The general role of the Maternity Nurse is to deliver care to the baby and help settle the baby into family life often helping to implement a routine. A Maternity Nurse is also on hand to assist the new parents enabling them to confidently handle and maintain the care of their baby.

A Maternity Nurse specialises in working with newborn babies within a family environment. Although the phrase ‘nurse’ is generally used a Maternity Nurse does not have to have a nursing qualification. The general role of the Maternity Nurse is to deliver care to the baby and help settle the baby into family life often helping to implement a routine. A Maternity Nurse is also on hand to assist the new parents enabling them to confidently handle and maintain the care of their baby.

A live-in position is usually based on a 24 hour rota. During this time the Maternity Nurse will usually take care of all of the needs of the baby and also support the Mother particularly if she chooses to breastfeed. The role may also include some cooking and/or light housework but this is normally discussed prior to confirmation of any booking. A nurse will usually take on average 2 breaks during the day, which are usually a few hours rest in the morning and a break for lunch/dinner. A day off is also expected at least every 5/6 days.

A Night Nurse will start work during the evening and will finish usually before or after the first morning feed. Their role involves establishing a good sleeping pattern and encouraging the baby to sleep through the night, but only when the baby shows signs that they are capable of going through the night without a feed. In between feeds the nurse is expected to rest and therefore is provided a bed or sofa to sleep on. A Night Nurse should be provided with either a room to sleep in or will often prefer to share the room with the baby. As well as doing all the night feeds the Night Nurse is expected to maintain feeding equipment, keep the baby clean throughout the night and often wash or dress the baby either in the morning or in the evening at the start of the shift (depending on the start time). The nurse is also expected to keep a diary allowing the parents to see the progress their baby has made, this also helps to keep the parents informed during the handover period.

All Maternity Nurses should have an enhanced and up to date CRB check and have a valid Paediatric First Aid certificate. Although qualifications are not required, parents often prefer to employ a nurse who has completed a course in baby care. Experience is also usually highly preferred too and nurses who have had babies of their own or have looked after many babies are often highly sought after. The benefits of a Maternity Nurse are for parents to have the reassurance that they are on the right pathway for a happy, contented baby as well as enabling them to have much needed rest as caring for a newborn baby can become tiring. The Maternity Nurse will also help you by showing you various techniques on how to deal with your baby and the beauty of this is that the methods used will be tailored to suit your child.

What They Say…